VISION: A world free of poverty, hunger and environmental degradation

MISSION: To advance agri-food science and innovation that enable poor people, especially poor women, to increase agricultural productivity and resilience, share in economic growth, better feed themselves and their families, and conserve natural resources in the face of climate change and other threats

 


 

INTRODUCTION

2016: Looking forward for future generations

The 2016 CGIAR Annual Report demonstrates the pivotal role that CGIAR’s 15 Research Centers collectively play in reducing poverty, enhancing food and nutrition security and improving natural resources and ecosystem services.

CGIAR is the largest global partnership addressing agricultural research for development. CGIAR Research Centers work on the ground with farmers in developing countries alongside partners, including national and regional research institutes, academic institutions, development organizations and the private sector.

ALIGNING WITH


THE GLOBAL GOALS

CGIAR
STRATEGIC GOALS


CGIAR
2030 TARGETS


  • 350 million more farm households have adopted improved varieties, breeds or trees, and/or improved management practice
  • 100 million people, 50% of them women, assisted in exiting poverty
  • Improve the rate of yield increase for major food staples from current <2.0 to 2.5%/year
  • 150 million more people, 50% of them women, meeting minimum dietary energy requirements
  • 500 million more people, 50% of them women, without deficiencies of one or more of the following essential micronutrients: iron, zinc, iodine, vitamin A, folate and vitamin B12
  • 33% reduction in women of reproductive age who are consuming less than the adequate number of food groups
  • 20% increase in water and nutrient (inorganic, biological) use efficiency in agro-ecosystems, including through recycling and reuse
  • Reduce agriculture related greenhouse gas emissions by
  • 8 Gt CO2-e yr–1 (15%), compared with a business-as-usual scenario in 2030
  • 190 million hectares (ha) degraded land area restored
  • 5 million ha of forest saved from deforestation

BIG WINS

  • Climate change: 4 million farm households with increased resilience to climate related risks
  • Aquaculture: 5 million tons of farmed fish produced more sustainably, and 2.3 million poor men, women and youth with access to improved livelihood opportunities
  • Livestock: more productive and adaptable chicken strains – benefiting 1.5 million households
  • Maize: drought tolerant, disease resistant and nutrient efficient maize – benefiting 7.5 million farmer households
  • Roots, tubers and bananas: 2 million ha converted to sustainable cropping systems and 1.5 million farmer households helped to recover from pests and diseases
  • Food safety: Helping smallholder farmers in 11 countries produce more than 1 million tons of low- aflatoxin maize and groundnut from 500,000 ha of fields treated with AflasafeTM
  • Forestry: an additional 25 million ha of forests across the tropics subject to sustainable forest management practices, avoiding the deforestation of 2 million ha
  • Raise investment in agricultural research: an additional USD1.5 billion invested in agricultural science in Sub-Saharan Africa

THE CGIAR RESEARCH


PORTFOLIO 2017-2022

Transforming global agriculture and food systems

In 2017 CGIAR embarks on a new program of innovative research programs and platforms, with a renewed emphasis on nutrition and health, climate change, soils and degraded land, food systems waste, food safety and the global stewardship of genetic resources. The portfolio is designed to contribute significantly to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals through CGIARs’ 2030 targets: 150 million fewer hungry people, 100 million fewer poor people – at least 50% of whom are women – and 190 million hectares less degraded land by 2030. The new portfolio is structured around three groups of challenge-led research programs:

Agri-Food Systems Programs

  • Fish
  • Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
  • Livestock
  • Maize
  • Rice
  • Roots, Tubers and Bananas
  • Wheat

Global Integrating Programs

  • Agriculture for Nutrition and Health
  • Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security
  • Policies, Institutions, and Markets
  • Water, Land and Ecosystems

Research Support Platforms

  • Platform for Big Data in Agriculture
  • Excellence in Breeding Platform
  • Genebank Platform 

Thanks to our funding partners, CGIAR research has transformed the lives of hundreds of millions of people through tangible research outcomes, and will continue to do so in the future.

OUR WORK IN 2016

CGIAR is uniquely placed to catalyze a transformation of the global food system. With a strong history of delivering impact at scale and a dynamic global network, CGIAR works to reduce poverty, strengthen food and nutrition security and improve natural resources and ecosystem services. Through research and innovation, CGIAR works in four key areas to achieve these goals:

  • Productivity, nutrition and resilience
  • Restoring global food systems
  • Management and decision support
  • Forging global partnerships

In the following pages, we explore each of these areas, by highlighting a few remarkable examples of our research and program achievements in 2016.


PRODUCTIVITY,


NUTRITION AND RESILIENCE

CGIAR creates new improved plant varieties and develops publicly available genetic improvements in crops, livestock, fish and trees to strengthen nutrition, livelihoods and resilience in the global food system.

EXAMPLES OF IMPROVED VARIETIES RELEASED WORLDWIDE IN 2016

111 MAIZE VARIETIES

61 WHEAT VARIETIES

49 RICE VARIETIES

 

CGIAR SCIENTISTS AWARDED


2016 WORLD FOOD PRIZE

In 2016, four CGIAR scientists were awarded the prestigious World Food Prize for their fight against malnutrition. These biofortification pioneers were recognized for having improved the health of 10 million rural poor in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

 

PULSES: NUTRITIONAL


POWERHOUSE


HOPE FOR


DRYLANDS


Pulses are remarkable: nutritious, affordable and good for the environment, and yet so often overlooked. In 2016, CGIAR joined with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the lead organization for the International Year of Pulses, to celebrate these important crops.

Harnessing Opportunities for Productivity Enhancement (HOPE) brought new technologies to increase production of dryland crops, reaching more than 180,000 households in some of the world’s poorest areas of India and Sub-Saharan Africa.

RAPID RESPONSE TO CROP


AND LIVESTOCK DISEASE


DEMAND DRIVEN


INNOVATION: PIGEONPEA


CGIAR programs respond to emerging threats to crops and livestock with strategic research, tested solutions and roll-out to those most in need.

In India, pigeonpea is a wonder crop and smart food, providing affordable protein for millions of families, especially the poorest.

RESTORING GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEMS

CGIAR builds and maintains a global store of seeds, which houses more than 750,000 accessions across 35 global collections, as well as a diverse collection of crop wild relatives, recognized as one of the most important resources available to plant breeders in the fight against climate change.

DROUGHT TOLERANT


MAIZE PROVIDES BIG


BENEFITS – PASS IT ON!

Like many farmers in the Zaka District of Zimbabwe, Appolonia Marutsvaka has suffered from lower yields in recent years, as drought tightened its grip on the land. But drought tolerant maize seed is giving this smallholder farmer, and others like her, fresh hope.

 

A GREENER


FUTURE FOR RICE


SYRIAN WAR PROMPTS


GLOBAL DOOMSDAY SEED


VAULT’S FIRST WITHDRAWAL


When typhoon Haiyan destroyed most of his coconut crop, Filipino farmer Felicito Montano turned to growing Green Super Rice (GSR).

The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) requested the first ever withdrawal from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in 2015.

MANAGEMENT AND


DECISION SUPPORT

CGIAR creates new tools – such as energy-efficient machinery – and new approaches – such as management of soil carbon and precision application of fertilizers – to help farmers and food systems become resilient, sustainable and productive.

QUALITY, LOW-COST FISH


FEED MADE BY FARMERS

In rural Bangladesh, finding low-cost, good- quality fish feed with a high content of protein and vitamins is a challenge for many rural farmers.

 

GEO-INFORMATICS FOR


DRYLAND DECISIONS


COMBATING AFLATOXIN –


THE SILENT KILLER


Two initiatives developed by the CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems offer a valuable contribution to research in drylands. Dr. Richard Thomas, a CGIAR scientist who led the work, explains.

Aflatoxin – highly toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins that contaminate certain crops in warm regions – can cause massive damage to farmer revenues, trade and public health.

STOP BURNING AND


INCREASE PROFIT


WITH ZERO TILLAGE

In New Delhi, 19 million inhabitants are under siege from a noxious haze generated by traffic, industries, cooking fires and the yearly burning of more than 30 million tons of rice straw from harvests in the neighboring states of Haryana and Punjab.

 

UPSCALING CLIMATE


INFORMATION


SURVEY REVEALS


WIDESPREAD CASSAVA


ADOPTION IN VIETNAM


In Senegal, a successful climate smart project is providing climate information to 7.4 million rural farmers using community radio and SMS.

An innovative study of cassava diversity in farmer fields, supported by the CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas, revealed that 90% of the cassava grown in Vietnam involves improved varieties developed using germplasm from the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).

IMPROVED TARGETING


FOR AGRICULTURAL


INTERVENTIONS


LETHAL LIVESTOCK DISEASE:


A DUAL OFFENSIVE


The United Nations has set ambitious targets to meet 17 Sustainable Development Goals, but choosing a particular intervention to achieve a given goal in a specific context – and measuring progress in meeting it – remains a challenge.

East Coast fever (ECF) is a devastating tick-transmitted cattle disease caused by a single-celled parasite (Theileira parva). Typically killing animals within just three weeks of infection, ECF occurs in 12 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, costing the lives of more than 1 million cattle annually and the continent annual losses of at least US$300 million.

FORGING GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

CGIAR convenes and participates in global and local partnerships that ensures new knowledge is adopted, and plays a critical role in major international initiatives, such as the Global Landscapes Forum, the Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture and REDD+.
 

FOOD SAFETY


A GLOBAL BURDEN

Globally, foodborne disease is responsible for an enormous health burden. Food safety challenges require the crafting of specific or more generic cost-effective solutions. Coupled with broader policy research these steps could influence tens of millions of consumers, millions of farmers and thousands of market agents in Africa and Asia.

 

GROUNDWATER HOLDS


PROMISE FOR


SMALLHOLDERS


IN ASIA AND AFRICA


EQUITY AND EMPOWERMENT


IN AGRICULTURE


Groundwater offers the potential to boost agricultural production, improve rural incomes and strengthen smallholders’ resilience to climate shocks.

A sustainable future for everyone depends on both women and men being included in research activities.

BARKING UP THE


RIGHT TREES


FORESIGHT MODELING


SUPPORTS DECISION-MAKING


In Brazil, large areas of Brazil nut trees, some of the tallest and longest- living trees on earth, were being cleared for farming and mining, putting livelihoods and forests at risk.

Climate change is expected to affect the price of food and the quality of diets around the world, causing an increase in annual deaths of over 500,000 by 2050.

GLOBAL LANDSCAPES


FORUM


NO ONE


LEFT BEHIND


More than 5,500 stakeholders working in forestry, agriculture, water, energy, law, finance and more came together for the fourth annual Global Landscapes Forum (GLF) on 16 November 2016 in Marrakesh, Morocco, to forge solutions to the planet’s greatest climate and development challenges through sustainable land use.

In 2016, International representatives from key sectors in agri-food research and innovation pledged to ‘leave no one behind’, committing to create more opportunities for rural women and youth, equip tomorrow’s farmers and researchers with the skills they need, and push for more increased investment, so that rural communities can grow and flourish.

ACCOUNTABILITY


AND IMPACT

INDEPENDENT


EVALUATION


ARRANGEMENT


INDEPEDENT SCIENCE


AND PARTNERSHIP


COUNCIL


The Independent Evaluation Arrangement (IEA) is an independent unit established to advise the System Council by providing accountability, contributing to learning and supporting decision- making through the conduct of evaluations on the overall performance of CGIAR research, and functions and structures of the CGIAR System.

The Independent Science and Partnership Council (ISPC) is a standing panel of scientific experts who work to strengthen the quality, relevance, and impact of CGIAR science. The ISPC provides independent advice and expertise to the funders of CGIAR and serves as an intellectual bridge between the funders and CGIAR.

HIGH IMPACT PUBLICATIONS

Global Nutrition Report 2016, the go-to reference for decision-makers, implementers  and  researchers for nutrition data globally, was published by the International Food Policy Research Institute. According to Altmetric, the report is in the top five percent of all research outputs ever tracked.

Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security produced 134 peer reviewed papers on climate change and agriculture in 2016, which had a wide readership. For instance, an article on setting a global target for emissions reduction in agriculture was in the top five percent of all research outputs measured by Altmetric, and was number one of 2,316 articles in the high-impact Global Change Biology.

Livestock and Fish, Humidtropics and Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security researchers co-authored an article published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (USA), showing that targeting poverty through improved market access and off-farm opportunities may be a better strategy for increasing food security than exclusively focusing on agricultural production and closing yield gaps.

Agriculture for Nutrition and Health, the International Livestock Research Institute and partners produced the first ever global mapping of antimicrobial use in livestock, building on momentum generated through publications on antimicrobial use and resistance in agriculture in high impact journals, including The Lancet.


 

OPEN ACCESS

Information and data are crucial raw materials to catalyze innovation and increase the impact of CGIAR, but they must be findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable, or FAIR, in order to do so.

In 2016, Open Access/Open Data/FAIR efforts focused on promoting culture change and extending support to Research Centers and CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs), and enhancing data interoperability and quality. The inclusion in 2016 CGIAR Research Program proposals and platforms of how information assets will be open and FAIR, language on data integration and interoperability, and budgets for these, represents a step forward in mainstreaming Open Access/Open Data and assuring that CGIAR and Research Center leadership recognize and support the need for resources to be FAIR – and that they are in turn supported in ensuring progress. Another major advance is the ability for CRPs to report relatively easily on progress regarding the FAIRness of their knowledge resources.

FUNDING


PARTNERS

CGIAR deeply appreciates the contributions from all our funding partners and we thank them for their significant investments in our work to build a food- secure future for all.

Thank you to our partners
who contributed to the
CGIAR Fund in 2016

Abu Dhabi

Austria

Bangladesh

China

Denmark

India

Iran

Korea

Mexico

Morocco

Thailand

The CGIAR 2011 – 2016 research portfolio would not have been possible without the generous support of the following funding partners.

ABU DHABI
AUSTRALIA
AUSTRIA
BANGLADESH
BELGIUM
BILL AND MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION
CANADA
CHINA
DENMARK
EUROPEAN COMMISSION

FINLAND
FRANCE
IDRC
IFAD
INDIA
IRAN
IRELAND
ITALY
JAPAN
KOREA
LUXEMBOURG

MEXICO
MOROCCO
NETHERLANDS
NEW ZEALAND
NIGERIA
NORWAY
PORTUGAL
RUSSIA
SOUTH AFRICA
SPAIN
SUDAN

SWEDEN
SWITZERLAND
THAILAND
THE WORLD BANK
TURKEY
UNITED KINGDOM
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


FINANCIAL


OVERVIEW


 

CGIAR greatly appreciates the contributions made by all its funding partners, and would like to thank its valued investors for their support, without which none of its work would be possible.

With an annual research portfolio of just over US$900 million, involving approximately 11,000 staff working in more than 70 countries, 40% of them women, the 15 CGIAR Research Centers are supported by Funders, countries, private foundations and regional and international organizations. These make a range of financial, technical and operational contributions, enabling CGIAR to pursue its strategic direction, follow agreed plans and deliver on promised outcomes and impact.

ABOUT US


GOVERNANCE


With effect from 1 July 2016, following agreement with the CGIAR System’s Research Centers and Funders, revised governance arrangements came into effect. The CGIAR System Framework provides for a CGIAR System Council and a CGIAR System Organization. The CGIAR System Organization, made up of the System Management Board and System Management Office and governed by the Charter of the CGIAR System Organization, provides governance to the CGIAR System in collaboration with the CGIAR System Council.

CGIAR System Council
Chair: Dr Juergen Voegele

The Council consists of up to 20 voting members, comprising up to 15 representatives of CGIAR’s Funders, and 5 developing country representatives. It meets at least twice per year to keep under review the strategy, mission, impact and continued relevancy of the CGIAR System in a rapidly changing landscape of agricultural research for development. A list  of members, alternates, ex-officio non-voting members and other representatives, along with information on meetings, committees and decisions, can be found on the CGIAR System Council page of our website.

CGIAR System Organization
Interim Chair, System Management Board: Prof Dr Martin Kropff
Executive Director: Elwyn Grainger-Jones

The Board, with its Interim Chair Prof Dr Martin Kropff, is responsible for providing strategic direction and effective governance and leadership of the CGIAR System Organization. The Board provides a mechanism for CGIAR’s 15 member Research Centers to participate in decisions that impact the operations of the CGIAR System Organization and the CGIAR System as a whole. Details of its members, meetings, committees and decisions taken can be found on the System Management Board pages of our website.

The System Organization’s Executive Director and non-voting ex-officio member of the System Management Board, Elwyn Grainger-Jones, heads the System Management Office. Montpellier-based, the Office carries responsibility for the day-to-day operations of the System Organization and for providing support to the System Council, System Management Board and the General Assembly

General Assembly of the Centers
Meeting at least once each calendar year, the General Assembly of Centers is a forum  for CGIAR Research Centers to discuss issues related to the CGIAR System and CGIAR System Organization. Among their important functions is nomination for election of voting membership of the System Management Board.

Learn more at: www.cgiar.org/about-us/our-governance/

RESEARCH


CENTERS

CGIAR Research Centers Placeholder
CGIAR Research Centers

CGIAR Member Center Headquarters

The Africa Rice Center
(AfricaRice)
www.AfricaRice.org

The International Potato Center
(CIP)
www.cipotato.org

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)
www.ilri.org

Bioversity International
www.bioversityinternational.org

The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA)
www.icarda.org

The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)
www.irri.org

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)
www.ciat.cgiar.org

The International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)
www.icrisat.org

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
www.iwmi.org

The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
www.cifor.org

The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
www.ifpri.org

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
www.worldagroforestry.org

The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)
www.cimmyt.org

The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
www.iita.org

DOWNLOAD

Download a copy of the 2016 CGIAR Annual Report as a PDF.

 

Special thanks for the many contributions from CGIAR Research Centers and Research Programs. Compiled by the CGIAR System Management Office with design and editing by Michael Dougherty; editing by Clare Pedrick; coordination by Samuel Stacey and Sara Quinn, CGIAR System Management Office. Online interactive version developed by Samuel Stacey, CGIAR System Management Office.

Front cover: the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Farms of the Future project uses exchange visits to connect farmers with their “future climate” and learn how to adapt and manage their practices in a variety of changing climate conditions. Nepal. Photo: Neil Palmer/CIAT.